Date: Friday 7th

Time: From: 11:10 a.m. to 12:10 p.m.

(1a) Classroom Observation –Training the trainers

When talking about observation, the focus is mainly on the teacher and the lesson plan, and not on the final product. Observers end up watching an unlikely example of the teacher’s lessons; paying attention to a list of assessment criteria such as pacing, organization of group work, rate of delivery, clarity of instructions and so on. But is there something else to take into account? What about if the teacher manages to get their students to use L2 efficiently? How does he/she do it? Does the observer leave room for individuality or human unpredictability?

Class observations are becoming more and more common these days, who has not had the experience of having been observed?  However, there is usually a kind of negative attitude towards class observation. Too often, teachers tend to view observations necessary while ” in training” but unnecessary afterwards unless a coordinator or supervisor is to visit your class because of school’s regulations in order to write up a report on your performance or a recommendation for rehiring.

So, what to do in order to change it?; what to do to make teachers aware of its importance in the area of professional growth?; are you ready or prepared to get into mutual exchange of classroom observations?
Once you get into the mainstream of the teaching world, it is very difficult to make time to go and see other teachers and to invite the same in return.
Fortunately, teachers are coming to understand that seeing one’s actions through another’s eyes is an indispensable tool for classroom research, not to mention how profitable this is for both observee and observer.
The purpose of this workshop is to get teachers to see class observations as basis for professional development, giving them the chance to do some reflection on their  own teaching.

 (1b) Using listening strategies and TED Talks to enhance listening comprehension

Listening is one of the most important skills in ELT and yet the area of language instruction that language teachers neglect the most. The principal reason for this neglect, as much research has shown, is that listening is the skill FL teachers understand the least and consequently lack teaching confidence. Another important reason is that instructional materials are often uninspiring and most of the time exclusively based on audio files, which results in low levels of motivation on the part of students.  The focus of this workshop is to provide teachers with solutions to these issues based on strategy training and the use of video recordings.

(1c) Smartphones: From toys to tools

Smartphones are changing user´s habits, also in language Learning, we teachers can leverage those devices to help students be better learners and make our classes more fun. Participants will discuss their own experiences with tech in the classroom, how they might apply apps and tools in their own classes. This workshop is for everyone, from newbies, to the tech-savvy. Come to watch and to share your experiences!

(1d) Boosting speaking and writing with some creative ideas

Most of the times students practice grammar with the sole purpose of passing a grammar or vocabulary evaluation. In this workshop we will practice producing texts which are meaningful and take into account different aspects of the structure and lexicon they have learned. This workshop will offer some proven ideas to work with oral and written skills. As we will be working in a workshop mode, participants will carry out some of the ideas applying the idea “to learn by doing”.

We also have to consider that working with people requires having a goal in mind that will make learning successful. Besides, when working with English, we need to design meaningful learning experiences taking advantage of the students’ knowledge and background. Finally, the experience needs to have a process and an outcome. The outcome needs to be of value in their lives and/or their learning environment.

Date: Friday 7th

Time: From: 12:20 p.m. to 1:20 p.m.

(2a)  Teaching in the age of distractions

The early 21st century is being characterized as the “age of distractions”. The average teenager exchanges about 100 messages per day, many of these during class hours. This is a problem because if there is no attention, then there is no learning.

This workshop will propose types of activities to avoid distractions. These activities are: constraints, challenges, and reflection time to promote mindful learning. Teachers will practice the activities and adapt them to their own contexts.

(2b)  Using listening strategies and TED Talks to enhance listening comprehension

Listening is one of the most important skills in ELT and yet the area of language instruction that language teachers neglect the most. The principal reason for this neglect, as much research has shown, is that listening is the skill FL teachers understand the least and consequently lack teaching confidence. Another important reason is that instructional materials are often uninspiring and most of the time exclusively based on audio files, which results in low levels of motivation on the part of students.  The focus of this workshop is to provide teachers with solutions to these issues based on strategy training and the use of video recordings.

 (2d) Make it meaningful and challenging: Learning styles and contests in the classroom.

This workshop focuses on the use of contests and games to promote higher levels of motivation and active participation in the EFL classroom, reinforcing at the same time values such as cooperative work, tolerance, and respect for rules.

It also highlights the importance of considering learning styles when preparing material. Participants will not simply refresh some interesting key concepts but will be highly involved as well by adapting the material presented to their own students’ needs. This workshop will show teachers how to keep students more engaged through simple but meaningful activities within a structured learning environment.

(2e)  Metacognition app to improve writing skills

Teachers often use a correction code which helps students improve their writing.  These codes help students to find the correct answer to their errors.  But, do they improve learning and accuracy?

This Metacognition App becomes a tool students can use in order to improve their wiring process and become aware of their learning in terms of linguistic, semantic and pragmatic levels of the language.    Participants will use the tool in order to provide feedback to students and will discuss about the usefulness this APP can have at the different educational levels.

Date: Friday 7th

Time: From: 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

(3a)  Aligning Teaching with Assessment: The Integrated Performance Assessment-IPA

Teaching and assessment should not be regarded as two different processes. However, it is common to detach one from the other. Often times, in the EFL classroom, instructors teach one way and then assess student learning outcomes in a totally different way. Usually, this “assessment” consists of discrete grammar point tests or tests that focus on writing, reading, listening and speaking individually (Liskin-Gasparro, 1996).

On the contrary, an integrated approach to assessing student learning outcomes sees teaching and assessment as two intertwined mechanisms. In the foreign language context, an integrated assessment approaches students’ language skills in terms of three interconnected modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal and Presentational. The assessment is based on authentic materials framed within a real-world task (Adair-Hauk, Glisan & Troyan, 2013).

In this hands-on workshop, attendees will play the role of students in an intermediate-level English language class. The attendees will work on an abbreviated IPA. At the end, there will be a discussion on the pedagogical implications and applications to the EFL teaching context outside of the U.S.

(3b)  Beyond 21st century skills – challenges ahead

Preparing a student for the world that doesn´t yet exist is not an easy task for any teacher. Our students have just as high a set of expectations of their educators as their educators have of them.

In this workshop participants will become familiar with these 21st Century Skills, will get hands-on experience at implementing some of them and will leave with a range of motivating activities suitable for their classrooms. Come to share your experiences!

(3c) Questioning for Productive Discussion

Discussion comes alive when students and teachers ask the “just right” question. This session will provide some useful tips to engage students at the highest levels of thinking and learning.

(3e) Classroom Observation –Training the trainers

When talking about observation, the focus is mainly on the teacher and the lesson plan, and not on the final product. Observers end up watching an unlikely example of the teacher’s lessons; paying attention to a list of assessment criteria such as pacing, organization of group work, rate of delivery, clarity of instructions and so on. But is there something else to take into account? What about if the teacher manages to get their students to use L2 efficiently? How does he/she do it? Does the observer leave room for individuality or human unpredictability?

Class observations are becoming more and more common these days, who has not had the experience of having been observed?  However, there is usually a kind of negative attitude towards class observation. Too often, teachers tend to view observations necessary while ” in training” but unnecessary afterwards unless a coordinator or supervisor is to visit your class because of school’s regulations in order to write up a report on your performance or a recommendation for rehiring.

 So, what to do in order to change it?; what to do to make teachers aware of its importance in the area of professional growth?; are you ready or prepared to get into mutual exchange of classroom observations?
Once you get into the mainstream of the teaching world, it is very difficult to make time to go and see other teachers and to invite the same in return.
Fortunately, teachers are coming to understand that seeing one’s actions through another’s eyes is an indispensable tool for classroom research, not to mention how profitable this is for both observee and observer.
The purpose of this workshop is to get teachers to see class observations as basis for professional development, giving them the chance to do some reflection on their  own teaching.

Date: Friday 7th

Time: From: 6:10 p.m. to 7:10 p.m.

(4b)    Enhancing critical thinking skills through effective questioning

Every day more and more teachers agree on the fundamental need for developing more critical thinking skills in our classrooms and although the topic can sometimes be perceived as intimidating, we are here to welcome and foster opportunities to work on it.

My aim is to show you that even a simple image can be used as an amazing thought provoking source as well as provide you with opportunities to reflect on how you use questioning to promote learning, self-assess the range of questioning techniques you use in the classroom and the most important of all, identify the type of questions that are better suited for enhancing critical thinking skills. I kindly encourage you to join the challenge.

(4c) Developing Meaningful Learning in the EFL Class

In this workshop we will be reflecting and talking about the different types of learning we use in our EFL classroom, such as rote learning, associative learning, active learning and meaningful learning.

We will also discuss about the advantages and disadvantages of each one and why we should pay attention to facilitating instead of teaching.

Finally, we will be discussing about how we can facilitate meaningful learning and improve our students´ critical thinking.

(4e) Encouraging creativity and imagination in writing through reverse reading.

Creativity and imagination are the key to any form of writing, be it academic or for pleasure. Yet in most cases when teaching writing, teachers are more worried about meeting time restraints than levels of creativity, a fact that stymies students’ ability to exercise their essential writing skills.

In this workshop, we will look at reverse writing and how it can help students to utilize their imagination when it comes to writing.

Date: Saturday 8th

Time: From: 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

(5b)  Coping with Mixed-ability classes

Teaching a mixed-ability class is the most common yet challenging environment an educator usually faces. When planning our lessons we have to consider the students’ learning styles, learning speed, motivation, affective filter and even their family backgrounds in order to overcome the difficulties that these kind of mixed-level classes provoke. Having to pair up students in mixed-ability classes will not be an easy task if we do not know which activity will or will not work better.

In this workshop you will be given some extension activities for stronger students as well as some support and tips for weaker students so that they all can have an effective learning experience. There are several specific strategies to increase student talk and participation as well as achievement both in a Cooperative and Project-based learning.

(5c) Vocabulary games and activities to work and enjoy

Experts have offered options or methods to teach English as a foreign language. These methods require some approaches to teach the target language, and one of them is the lexical approach. Michael Lewis and Jimmy Hill state that “The lexical approach concentrates on developing the learners’ proficiency with lexis, or words and word combinations”. In our experience, lexicon is an essential part of any language which many times both students and teachers neglect. What is more, we have seen students with very good grammar who do not have the words to make sense when trying to communicate. Through a series of dynamic activities students will work with their passive lexicon making it active by remembering, practicing and expanding it.

(5d) Using variety in the EFL class

In this presentation the speaker will share some interesting and meaningful activities to be used not only to reduce anxiety in the classroom but also to promote learning experiences among the students.

(5e) Metacognition app to improve writing skills

Teachers often use a correction code which helps students improve their writing.  These codes help students to find the correct answer to their errors.  But, do they improve learning and accuracy?   This Metacognition App becomes a tool students can use in order to improve their wiring process and become aware of their learning in terms of linguistic, semantic and pragmatic levels of the language.    Participants will use the tool in order to provide feedback to students and will discuss about the usefulness this APP can have at the different educational levels.

Date: Saturday 8th

Time: From: 9:10 a.m. to 10:10 a.m.

(6a) The Essential Elements of the Successful 21st Century Classroom

How do we define a successful classroom? What elements, when combined, create an environment that encourages the maximum level of learning? Each and every year, society’s expectations of education and it´s teachers change. Modern technology, expanded career requirements, autonomous working expectations require the re-thinking of the education that we provide, and the way that we deliver it. In this presentation, we will look at the essential elements that are required in the 21st century classroom in order for our students to meet not only the educational requirements, but the personal skills needed to succeed in our modern world.

(6b) Managing Learning Disabilities in the EFL Classroom

Learning difficulties are often not considered as relevant in the EFL classroom.  This research based-practical workshop will briefly cover what are some of the common learning disabilities; how to notice the warning signs; tools for testing and referral; and how to work with students in the EFL classroom and with their parents.

(6e) The Growth Mindset: Empowering Students to Achieve and Succeed

This session will present activities to motivate your students to believe in themselves and achieve anything.

Inicio

07 jul
Lugar
Universidad de Piura – Campus Piura (Av. Ramón Mugica 131, Urb. San Eduardo)
Contacto
Centro de Idiomas
(073) 28-4500 ext. 3912
idiomas@udep.pe

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